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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

4 edition of Slime molds and research found in the catalog.

Slime molds and research

Constantine John Alexopoulos

Slime molds and research

[by] C. J. Alexopoulos and James Koevenig.

by Constantine John Alexopoulos

  • 70 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Heath in [Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Myxomycetes.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesBSCS pamphlets,, no. 13.
    ContributionsKoevenig, James.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK635 .A4
    The Physical Object
    Pagination36 p.
    Number of Pages36
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5934376M
    LC Control Number65000677
    OCLC/WorldCa1908773

    Stephenson has studied fungi and slime molds on six continents in climates ranging from the tropics to the polar regions of both the Arctic and Subantarctic. He is author/co-author of numerous publications, including "Myxomycetes: A Handbook of Slime Molds" (Timber Press, ) and "Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms of the World" (Timber Press, ).   Slime molds were likely an inspiration for the science-fiction film, “The Blob,” scientists say. And it’s in these plasmodial, “blob” states that they spread like highway networks.

      Also called slime molds or social amoebas, they are very different from the mold found on old bread. The variety that eats decaying wood seeks food by sending out thin strands in various directions. When a nutrient is located, tendrils with the shortest and most efficient path thicken, while other unsuccessful branches pull : Dr. Don Deyoung. A slime mold, like the one shown here, leaves a trail of snotlike goo behind it. New research shows that a slime mold can tell where it’s been and usually avoids traveling on its own previous paths. Courtesy of Audrey Dussutour A slime mold called Physarum polycephalum .

    This book questions intentionality posed as "intelligence" in nature. The author found a better term as the result of a visit to Japan where there in not such a distinction of man-vs-nature in the concept of chi-sei, which conotates a sort of knowingness or recognizing-ness and as exemplified by creatures such as slime molds which lack a nervous system or a brain, are unicellular yet can /5. Slime molds live in areas with lots of moisture and decaying organic matter such as wood mulch or decaying trees. They are found all over the world, including such diverse areas as deserts and mountains. There are many genera of slime molds. The most common slime mold in Mississippi turf is Physarum, which is usually grayish in color. The circular patches of yellow to pink.


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Slime molds and research by Constantine John Alexopoulos Download PDF EPUB FB2

The slime molds are generally little noticed, but very strange life forms that could easily fit in a science fiction book. The swarm cells and myxamoebae unite to form first an amoeboid zygote, then the strange, crawling, plasmodium stage, and finally the fungus-like fruiting body/5(10).

Noted biologist and author John Tyler Bonner has experimented with cellular slime molds for more than sixty years, and he has done more than anyone else to raise these peculiar collections of amoebae from a minor biological curiosity to a major model organism--one that is widely studied for clues to the development and evolution of all living by: The Social Amoebae draws the big lessons from decades of research, and shows how slime molds fit into and illuminate biology as a whole.

Slime molds are very different from other organisms; they feed as individual amoebae before coming together to form a multicellular organism that has a remarkable ability to move and orient itself in its.

Slime molds are among the world’s strangest organisms. Long mistaken for fungi, they are now classed as a type of amoeba. As single-celled organisms, they have neither neurons nor brains.

Yet for about a decade, scientists have debated whether slime molds have the capacity to learn about their environments and adjust their behavior accordingly.

Slime mold or slime mould is an informal name given to several kinds of unrelated eukaryotic organisms that can live freely as single cells, but can aggregate together to form multicellular reproductive structures. Slime molds were formerly classified as fungi but are no longer considered part of that kingdom.

Although not forming a single monophyletic clade, they are grouped within the. Hunting Slime Molds and Stephenson’s research associate, Randy Darrah.

in an illustration of their lumpy-looking gray fruiting bodies in Stephenson’s book Myxomycetes: A Handbook of Author: Adele Conover. A third group, the Labyrinthulomycota or slime nets, are also called "slime molds", but appear to be more closely related to the Chromista, and not relatives of the other "slime mold" groups.

What these three groups have in common is a life cycle that superficially resembles that of the fungi. Slime molds move, and lack chitin in their cell walls. They are now classified as belonging to the Kingdom Protista (Protoctista).

Mycologists have studied them for so long that slime molds are still included in mycology textbooks. Physarum polycephalum is a plasmodial slime mold. The. The book also touches on the potential for basic and applied research on myxomycetes in areas as diverse as biological monitoring and robotics.

Stephenson co-edited the book with Carlos Rojas, a professor in the Department of Biosystems Engineering at the University of Costa Rica.

Slime Mould in Arts and Architecture presents a set of unique chapters written by leading artists, architects and scientists, which resulted from creative translations of slime mold behavior into forms and sounds, unconventional investigations and sensorial experiences and the slime mold ability to remove boundaries between living and.

MEREDITH BLACKWELL, JOSEPH W. SPATAFORA, in Biodiversity of Fungi, ACRASID SLIME MOLDS. Acrasid slime molds have been separated from the other groups of slime molds in most studies of the last three decades.

Emphasis on the movement and behavior of the amoebae caused a number of workers not only to separate the acrasids but also to suggest a close relationship to organisms with. InAngela Mele drove three hours through the Ozarks to meet Steve Stephenson at the University of Arkansas.

Mele — at the time an intern at a natural history exhibit design company based in Missouri — is a huge fan of Stephenson’s research of myxomycetes, better known as slime molds.

Stephenson, a research professor [ ]. Slime mold, any of about species of primitive organisms containing true nuclei and resembling both protozoan protists and fungi.

slime mold A slime mold (Enteridium lycoperdon) in its reproductive phase. Roger Griffith. Read More on This Topic. microbiology: Slime molds. The slime molds are a biological and taxonomic enigma because they are. The Social Amoebae: The Biology of Cellular Slime Molds – John Tyler Bonner (BOOK) Key Takeaways: Two distinct types of slime molds exist, acellular and cellular, and Dr.

Dussutour studies the acellular Physarum polycephalum aka Le Blob-The blob is one giant cell containing many nuclei that can crawl around and explore. Once thought to be fungi, slime molds are now recognized to be very different from fungi. Indeed, slime molds are now classified as one of the five main divisions of life (the other four are fungi, bacteria, plants, and animals).

There are three main groups of slime molds. The first group is known as the plasmodial slime molds, or Myxomycetes.

Slime molds are not plants or animals but they share the characteristics of both. They are found all over the world, yet they remain mostly a mystery to scientists. They come in all shapes and sizes, ranging from yellow-tinted blobs to pinkish spheres. Walker is studying a group of slime molds known as myxomycetes.

Book Description: Noted biologist and author John Tyler Bonner has experimented with cellular slime molds for more than sixty years, and he has done more than anyone else to raise these peculiar collections of amoebae from a minor biological curiosity to a major model organism--one that is widely studied for clues to the development and evolution of all living things.

About this book. Where the Slime Mould Creeps introduces the fascinating world of myxomycetes, the plasmodial or acellular slime moulds. It describes their life cycle, the different types of plasmodia and fruiting bodies, and includes numerous photographs that illustrate this important but little-known subject.

Members of the genus Physarum are also called slime molds. Slime molds are classified with protists. More than different species of slime molds exist.

They have a two-part life cycle. During warm, moist weather, a slime mold lives as a shapeless, growing blob called a plasmodium. The plasmodium may be gray, cream, colorless, bright yellow. Breaking ground in slime mold research Date: Decem She was drawn to their shapes, sizes and colors and she bought Steve Stephenson's book, Myxomycetes: A Handbook of Slime Molds.

John Bonner, the George M. Moffett Professor of Biology, Emeritus, whose influential work with cellular slime molds shed light on the mechanisms of microbial life and illuminated the behavior of cells in all life forms, died in Portland, Oregon, on Thursday, Feb.

was A three-time chair of the Department of Biology, Bonner served on the Princeton faculty for 42 years and remained.Phylogenetically, slime molds are more related to the amoeboid protozoa than the fungi. There are two types of slime molds.

The cellular slime molds are composed of single amoeboid cells during their vegetative stage, whereas the vegetative acellular slime molds are made up of plasmodia, amorphic masses of protoplasm.Slime molds in mulches typically appear in summer after rainfall and are frequently observed when they form large, colorful colonies on the surface of mulch around trees, shrubs, and perennials.

Size is variable, ranging from several inches to 2 feet or more in diameter, with an irregular shape.